PIM Project 3 Sketch_Portability: Regent mirrors

a) a sketch entirely using the mobile phone without using a computer

With these two sketches I am still working entirely using the iphone and am uploading directly to Vimeo.

In previous sketches the main exploration of portability has been the fact that the phone is light and easy to carry and is with us most of the time. It makes it a great tool to capture a moment anywhere anytime. But what do we do with the moments? And why do they matter? And how do they extend me as an artist and film maker?

Thinking about this I recall that last year while working in the city I spent many lunch hours shooting still images of what I saw. I focused on light, composition, tone and made choices whether to shoot in colour or black and white. I have added some of these shots below. So for the two sketches here I have explored thinking about image, shape and composition. Both sketches are shot from a low angle outside the Regent Theatre. There are mirrors with beautiful brass frames at the foot of the stairs of the theatre. As people approach you can see them in the mirror, then for a moment they pass by in real life, then they vanish, cut off by the frame of the mirror. I include two sketches. I haven’t used any music, just the diegetic sound and I have only cropped the start and ends.

This first video provides some context, we can get a sense of the mirror and see the final letter of Regent on the mirror suface.

This second sketch does not explore the richness of the brass frames or typography but I think it better captures the feel of seeing people approach, be momentarily visible, then vanish.

These sketches are also evidence that the smallness and commoness of the smart phone means that even though some people do notice me filming they are don’t stop, turn away, or even look at me and the camera as they pass by. Ethics? ACMI provides a useful post on copyright law and ethics.

http://generator.acmi.net.au/resources/legal-and-ethical-issues

Also this is the Arts Law Centre of Australia has a really useful post about issues of when, where and who you can film.

Of shooting peopole (with a camera) in the street, it says:

The first thing to know about people photography is that there is no personal or publicity right in one’s personal image, so there’s no need to ‘clear’ anything before taking pictures of someone’s face. Current privacy laws are concerned more with the collection and storage of personal information meaning there is no right of privacy, and neither is there (at least thus far) a tort of invasion of privacy. As such, snapping a picture of someone in the street in an urban scene or because you like their fashion sense is generally allowed.

Things get a little more complicated when you photograph people for a commercial purpose, such as a poster where someone’s face is used to sell or advertise a product or service. In this case the subject of the photograph will need to have signed a model release form in order for their picture to be taken. If a photograph of a person is used commercially without that person’s permission, you could potentially be liable for misrepresentation, the tort of passing off, or defamation.

Be aware also that there sensitivities around the photography of people in certain circumstances, and also children. Snapping pictures of people in a private act where they would reasonably expect to be afforded privacy without their permission such as in the bath, on the toilet, or engaged in sexual activities, is a punishable offence under New South Wales law. With children, charges can be laid in many states such for taking “indecent” photographs of a child under the age of 16 without a legitimate reason, even the child was in a public place. These are criminal offences and can result in a fine or imprisonment.

Below are some of the still images I referred to above, taken in the city:

 

brick wall

 

door handle

Elizabeth Street

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s